The Meeting: Cal and Margaret

Calvin Hutchings was attending BYU, majoring in pre-dent when he met Margaret Clark. He was living with the Hansen family in Pleasant View; this was close to where the BYU stadium stands today. Three young men had lived with the Hansens, but they liked Cal the best. Brother Hansen was a geology professor at the university. He had a daughter named Carol who was a good friend of Margaret’s younger sister, Bobby.

One evening Bobby went to stay overnight with Carol; together they plotted how to get Cal and Margaret together. Carol had a crush on Cal and was always sneaking friends in to see this good-looking guy. The girls told Cal that Bobby had a cute older sister and he should consider taking her out. Cal seemed willing, but wondered how to go about meeting her. They told him Margaret was a clerk at Firmage’s department store in downtown Provo, and set him up to go there. In the meantime, Bobby and Carol had been telling Margaret about this cute guy staying at the Hansen’s house. They kept encouraging her to meet him and Margaret was interested.

Calvin went to Firmages to check out this girl he had heard so much about. He followed Margaret around for a while and then finally introduced himself. Cal asked her to go out with him. Margaret was a junior in high school at the time. When her Mother found out she said, “You can’t go out with him, you don’t know anything about him.”   Margaret replied, “He’s staying at the Hansen’s house, you can call and ask Mrs. Hansen all about him.”   Her Mother did just that and was given a beaming report on Calvin.

Cal and Margaret dated for two years. Calvin had previously enlisted in the V-1 Naval program in 1942 following graduation from High School. This program allowed him to continue his education without being drafted. After he finished his pre-dental courses at BYU, he was called up to report for duty to the naval base in Seattle, Washington. While there, he met Margaret’s brother, Grant, also in the navy, and they became good friends.

During this time, Margaret graduated from high school and went to work at the telephone company. Cal was in Washington at the naval hospital for nine months waiting to get into dental school. During this time, he and Margaret corresponded frequently. When fall came, he was sent to the University of Iowa.

It was a lonely time for Calvin who was far away from home and his girl. Just before Christmas, he called and proposed to Margaret over the telephone. Margaret hesitated, she wanted to wait until spring, but Cal said, “Now or never!” So she said, “Yes.”Calvin & Margaret

Calvin flew into Salt Lake the day before Christmas, his parents picked him up at the airport and took him home. On Christmas day he drove to Margaret’s home in Provo and they immediately began making wedding plans. They decided to be married on Thursday December 28th, that day the Salt Lake temple was having a special session for servicemen home on leave. Margaret recalls it being a busy, but exciting time. The day after Christmas they rushed around, first they went to get their blood tests and then a marriage license. This was followed by an interview with the bishop for a temple recommend. With so little time to prepare, Margaret’s Mother, Laura, called the Dixon-Taylor department store and arranged for someone to open up that evening just for Margaret and her mother. That night the two of them went shopping for some of the necessary items Margaret would need to set up housekeeping.

The big day arrived: December 28, 1944, Calvin and Margaret were married in the Salt Lake temple surrounded by loved ones from the Clark and the Hutchings families.

The ceremony was beautiful. Margaret wore a white skirt and blouse she had purchased for the temple. She recalls that the sleeves were short, so the sisters at the temple put something over her arms. She tells how her dear sister, Cecil, had stayed up the night before, sewing her a burgundy skirt and top for the wedding breakfast that would follow the temple ceremony, and then she drove to Salt Lake the next day.

DaCosta, the only one of her brothers home at the time, arranged for a wedding luncheon at Hotel Utah for the two families. Mother remembers the lunch being very lovely. She said, the wedding cake, which was made in the hotel bakery, was beautiful and had a lovely taffy candy ribbon around it.

That evening, Calvin and Margaret returned to Provo and stayed at the Clark home. Margaret recalls, “We had just fallen to sleep when the furnace started smoking. The snow had been falling all day and water seeped into the coal causing it to stick together. I had to get out of bed, go down to the basement and stoke the furnace to get it going again.”

Their was no time for a honeymoon for the very next day Margaret and Calvin took a train back to Iowa City. The cars were packed full of servicemen traveling to the east coast where they would be shipped overseas to the war front. Margaret was the only woman onboard and even though she had paid for a ticket, the train conductor said all the seats were for servicemen. During the trip, Dad or one of the other men would let her take their seat for a time, but when the conductor came around she had to sit on her suitcase. The trip took two days and a night. There were no sleeping cars open so they sat up all night.